Revitalizing Your College Ham Club

Matthew Beiz recently asked the members of the Collegiate Ham Radio Operators Facebook page for ideas on how to build interest in our essential avocation among a young audience dealing with lots of technological distractions. Here are a few thoughts from our work to rebuild the Michigan State University Amateur Radio Club:

Screen Shot 2016-08-30 at 9.55.35 AMGo where the action is – Build a robust Facebook presence, Twitter identity and a dynamic club website. Make sure they are regularly updated with relevant content. Engage in social media conversations with other hams.


MSUARC Welcome FlierUpdate your shack
– Dave Sumner, K1ZZ, the venerable ARRL CEO emeritus, came to MSU because we had a Collins S-Line setup. Your shack should reflect the state of the art. Buy the best gear you can afford, including contesting headphones and logging computers. Install a flat screen TV outside and create a continually updated slide show depicting waterfalls, satellite passes, real time propagation forecasts and other eye candy. Keep your shack spotless. Adorn your walls with awards, QSL cards and pictures of club activities. ARRL’s Ward Silver adds, “When the computer is not being used, leave a web browser on dxmaps.com or run Viewprop to show contacts being continually made around the world. The busier the map, the better. Add a ‘viewer’s guide’ next to the screen. People understand maps and lines on the maps.”

Build cool club projects – Consider building an HF ALE node. Enable your repeater with Allstar / Echolink. Deploy a D-Star hotspot in your shack. Install a satellite station. Overlay the campus WiFi with a solar powered HSMM network. Our club station is in the midst of installing  an APRS gateway with a 24/7 display showing APRS activity in our area.

Be aggressive in seeking out potential members – Paper the dorms with fliers announcing club events and inviting people to visit your shack. Work with an advertising class to create a membership marketing campaign. It should have tactics for fall move-in, radio sport, one to one recruiting, email and social media activities. Have current members bring one or two new people to a meeting. Devise radio activities for non-licensed people. Try geocache/foxhunts (“geofoxing”). Partner a non-licensed person with a ham to share an event. Make it easy for them to participate and see ham radio in action.

Hold weekly open shack nights – Invite alumni to man the shack on a specific night every week and publicize that you’re there. Have demos of digital modes displayed on your shack computers and snag passers by to take a spin on a GOTA (get on the air station).

MSUHamRadioLogoBrand, brand, brand – Create an approved club logo and put it on t-shirts, banners and club promotions. Design a club name badge (make it big and easy to read) for your members. If your school allows “chalking”, writing club info on sidewalks with chalk, create a stencil of the club logo and website address and liberally chalk it around campus.

Get people licensed – Meet with the professors who teach robotics and RF courses that might use ham frequencies for command and control. Get them make a ham license part of the class requirements. Sponsor a ham-in-a-day class to get students on the air.

Make Connections – Hold a weekly, All-Star / Echolink connected net. Encourage those without rigs to download the Echolink app and participate on their smart device. Check in to the nets that other schools run to support their activities. Listen and learn. Keep your HT on the club repeater and respond when you hear someone throw out their call.

Create an endowment to provide ARRL memberships to student hams – If an endowment is beyond your club’s current capacity, reach out to a group of alumni and invite them to sponsor a student ham’s membership. Sponsorship might also include taking that student to lunch or dinner and inviting them with you to local swaps or radiosport activities.

MSUARC HeaderHave a visible presence at campus events – Create a ham radio service corps with custom shirts and or reflective vests with your club website address on it. Offer your services to student government, athletics and student life. Be in evidence at important events as an information resource. Deploy someone at the central communications point to be the disseminator and to answer questions.

Great clubs have great programming – Before the year starts, line up at least 6 really great programs for club meetings. Our engineering dean does an annual antenna lecture that always draws a crowd. Talk about cutting edge technologies like DMR and the digital modes. Partner with the Astronomy department for a combination satellite pass demonstration and star gazing evening. Hold a meeting in your maker space and build satellite antennas. Arrange a balloon launch with an APRS package on board. Demo cool things you can do with a Raspberry Pi. Put an APRS tracker on your school mascot on game day. Ask every club what their most popular programs are and clone them.

MSUARCFBPageQRCodeRepurpose recent ham magazines as give aways – This chestnut has been used for years. Create labels to cover the address area on the magazine cover that has your club contact information on it with, “Learn more about amateur radio here:” at the top. We paste a full page info sheet inside the front cover and disseminate the magazines in areas where other publications are. Be sure to include a QR code that can be scanned into mobile devices to take the user to the club website. Speaking of QR codes, put yours code on a sandwich sign on campus where people are present so they can scan it on the spot and jump right to your FB or web page.

TS480 Remote RigSetup a Remote Rig that students can check out – We have a Kenwood TS-480 with RemoteRig gear connected to a radio in the MSUARC shack. Students can sign out control heads and operate from anywhere on campus via WiFi. The unit also makes it super easy to deploy a demo station during university events, football tailgates, etc.

Virtual Tailgate PosterCreate Special Events Stations – MSUARC had great success with our 2015 virtual tailgate special events stations. We had alumni in the shack two hours prior to each MSU home football game and awarded limited edition QSL cards to those who made contacts. At the end of the season we provided a poster, on which contesters could affix their cards.

Stream your meetings – With Facebook Live, Periscope and Livestream, broadcasting your meetings is becoming easier. It’s a great way to get alumni and friends connected from afar.

Create a digital resource library – Scan your key documents into PDFs, share important hotlinks, archive audio and video. If you have the resources, consider putting these things behind a firewall for “members only”.

Reach out to the ARRL – The League has a ton of great resources for clubs and can connect you with other members who can share their wisdom.

Experiment! You never know what might or might not work until you try it out. Don’t be afraid to fail along the way. That’s how you learn. And reach out to other clubs to see how they are approaching the challenge. You can always learn from others who have walked the path.

Early Television

From 1945, a documentary aimed at returning service men and women, describing the advances in “electronic television”. Thanks to N8FMQ for the link!

The Thrills and Agonies of Radiosport

Scott WestermanBy Scott Westerman – W9WSW

How many of us remember Jim McKay’s introduction to ABC’s Wide World of Sports? “The thrill of victory… And the agony of defeat!” Such are the joys and frustrations for enthusiasts of Radiosport.

Radiosport, the term coined for the dogged pursuit of the many certificates and awards available to those who love injecting watts into a wire. Many still call it contesting. My XYL would call it an addiction in our house. Any way you slice it, it can be great fun!

Screen Shot 2016-08-07 at 12.31.23 PMRight now we’re in the midst of the League’s National Parks on the Air (NPOTA) contest, a year long celebration of some of America’s most famous places. I’ve talked to fellow hams in every corner of the country, from Yellowstone to the White House, from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and everywhere in between. At last check, the leaderboard shows the top contesters approaching the 300 mark. That’s doubly impressive when you think about the fact that the QSOs require amateurs to take their gear to every location, many far from the conveniences on our end of the conversation.

For those dedicated to Radiosport, we have notifications turned on for the ARRL’s NPOTA Facebook page and have tuned our DX cluster filters to grab a spot, the instant it comes up. I get texts from my buddies when a rare one pops above the noise level. And it’s not uncommon for some of us to run home from work to log a set of call letters we need to move one step closer to our goal.

On the downside of one of the most disappointing sunspot cycles in a lifetime, it can also be an exercise in frustration. NPOTA activators run “barefoot”, with no linear amplification. Their antenna systems are usually a compromise to facilitate transportation and set-up. And when the ionosphere doesn’t cooperate, you can scream your lungs out and few can hear you.

How can you pull a signal out of the mud and compete effectively in kilowatt pileups? Here are some tips for building your Radiosport skillset.

Listen – Every operator approaches contesting in his or her own way. Don’t simply dive into a pile up. Listen for a few minutes to learn how people are getting heard. Good operators navigate pile-ups like air traffic controllers, taking incoming QSOs via call areas or making note of two or three stations at a time and asking for specific call letters after concluding a contact. Even with a number of 1,000 watters out there, an op will keep their ears open for lighter signals and give them a shot. The more you can decipher the style, the more likely you are to make a connecti0n.

Have a propagation plan – K9Jy suggests using one of the many propagation programs available to know when you’re most likely to get a good circuit between your location and the target area. Certain bands work better at certain times of day. And activity on the sun can throw conventional wisdom into the garbage can. Understanding band conditions can give you a sense for when to call and when to turn off the rig and do something else.

Spend time with a winner – The best contesters have systems they use for everything from spotting to logging. And most will gladly share their secrets. They plan ahead. They recruit partners to help with the logs. And they do post-action analyses to see what worked and what didn’t, constantly refining their system and improving their chances for victory.

Know your rig – Today’s radios have a complex feature set that lets you customize just about everything. Experiment with filters, watch your AGC settings and make sure the signal you’re putting out is as clear and as high quality as possible. And don’t forget your antenna system. That’s the single most crucial link in the chain. A good one can turn a few watts into a powerful signal. A bad one diminishes even the most powerful transmitter and hides weak signals in the mud.

Try CWMorse Code contesting can be one of the most rewarding ways to earn awards. It’s a language that is best learned through immersion and with regular practice. And it’s a mode that can work well when voice signals lie below the noise floor. Since it requires extra effort, there may be fewer competitors in the space. And many contests give extra credit for those who can speak with their fist.

These thoughts scratch the surface of the rewarding experience that we hams call Radiosport. The most important tip is to dive in and join the fun. Find your own rhythm and experiment. Like any skill, you’ll definitely improve with time.

See you in the arena!

73! DE W9WSW

 

Meeting the Media – 7 Steps to Building Productive Relationships

Scott WestermanBy Scott Westerman – W9WSW

The best way to build your network is before you need it. That’s why we practice emergency communications skills at events like Field Day and participate in Radiosport. That was the motivator for the famed Rocky Mountain Hams to build a state of the art broadband microwave network to facilitate high speed multimedia modes. Smart people who are thinking of a career change, get to know people who can help them before they come above the radar.

And so it is in the public relations realm. We live in a world where relationships rule. It’s crucial to get to know the key media contacts in your area before you need them. Here’s how to do it.

Do your homework – Find out who the key voices are at your local newspaper, radio and TV stations. Follow social media personalities who have significant traction in your market. And get to know who they are as people. What’s their backstory? What do you know about their family, education and home town? What made them decide to enter the business? What’s their beat? What kind of stories interest them most?

Be authentically interested in them – We’re drawn to people who are genuinely interested in us, individuals who can help us achieve our objectives. To build productive relationships with others, you must show authentic interest in them and help them achieve their goals.

Add value to their lives – Often times this may not even involve amateur radio. One of my favorite questions is, “What’s keeping you up at night?” With my vast network of ham friends, there’s almost always somebody who can help solve a problem, smooth out a bump or make an introduction. Think about these things as you plan your first encounter.

Making contact – Here’s my drill: When a new reporter comes to town, I send them a welcome email. “Just wanted to send you a personal note of welcome to East Lansing! I love watching 6 News and from what I can tell, you’re going to be a great asset to the team and a welcome addition to the community. Once you get your feet under you, I’d love to buy you a sandwich and learn more about your adventures.” Sign it with you name and title, followed by, “Avid 6 News Fan!”

This will almost always elicit a brief, grateful response that may include a phone number. Call it and set up that lunch.

You can modify the language if you’re the new person in the role, something like, “I’m Scott Westerman, the new public information guy at the MSU Amateur Radio Club. I’m sure our paths have crossed at some point, but I wanted to send you a quick fan letter to thank you for the excellent job 6 News does covering our community. I’m fascinated by what you do and hope we can grab a sandwich at some point so I can learn more about your backstory and how MSUARC can best add value to what you do.”

What to do when you are face to face – When the inevitable face to face meeting takes place, start out by focusing totally on them. “Tell me your life story,” is one of my favorite opening lines. People are fascinating and everybody has a unique tale to tell. Practice active listening skills and drill down for opportunities to add value to their personal lives. Always try to add value before asking for anything.

And when you do, frame it as asking for advice. How do you decide what stories get on the air? What are some of the most important issues you’re covering in the community right now? And finally…

What’s the best process for pitching a story about amateur radio?

That’s “the money question”, as they say in the biz. Each media organization has a process for how they like to gather information. Learn it and follow the rules. You’re more likely to get coverage when you do.

In the social media realm, you can talk about the personality’s content strategy. Based on your homework, you’ll already know more than a little bit about what they do. Social media fundamentals like providing link shorteners and great images will make it easier for someone to retweet your stuff. Ask them what kind of things they like to amplify and why. You’ll be in a stronger position to gain traction when you need it.

Be grateful – Follow the tried and true Japanese tradition of bringing a gift, something that’s likely to stay on their desk at the office. And end the meeting with a selfie which you can post with their social media handle saying something like, “Great lunch today talking #HamRadio w @6NewsJane. Love how they keep our community covered!” That’s almost guaranteed to get an instant retweet. Continue the relationship by retweeting their stuff as you see fit.

And always send a handwritten thank you note with a business card and one of your QSL cards enclosed. Personal notes are rare commodities today and will get attention.

Keep working on the relationship – Building productive media partnerships takes time. But it pays huge dividends. Beyond creating a welcoming environment for your stories, you will likely earn some good friends along the way. By entering the conversation with a goal of serving them, you are also reinforcing the foundation of why hams do what we do. We’re here to serve the community.

Build your media networks carefully, slowly and proactively. Like a well designed, carefully linked repeater system, they will serve you well when you need them most.

Have questions? How can I add value? Write to W9WSW(at)ARRL.net.

The ARRL 2016 Hurricane Preparedness Webinar

How contesting skills can prepare you for public service communications

The American Radio Relay League‘s Ward Silver’s terrific webinar on leveraging contesting as training for public service communications.

VHF saves the day in Star Trek Beyond

13718497_1223789124305982_4613544605811296280_n

Great to see the Star Trek crew use VHF to beat the bad guys in “Beyond”. 6 meters turned out to be the Magic Band, “when all else failed”.

MSUARC Memories – The 2015 Virtual Tailgates

13719555_1223204401031121_758181840311201483_o

Memories of the 2015 football season. MSUARC offered commemorative QSL cards for contacts made during our virtual tailgate parties prior to each home game, complete with a suitable-for-framing poster to display them. Thanks to Gregg WB8LZG for organizing the event and to Francie at the Michigan State University College of Engineering for her artistry.

MSUARC activates NPOTA AA07

13692709_10208010706124077_3776956809800781963_n
Bruce, K2BET and Ed, W8EO at AA07 near St. Ignace, Michigan. Learn more about The ARRL’s National Parks on the Air here.

Ham Radio 101: How to read a resistor

13507105_1207895829228645_4313786415973589836_n

←Older